THE LEADERSHIP JOURNEY PODCAST, SEASON 2, EPISODE 20: Charles McMullen

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Over the next two weeks the guest on the podcast is Charles McMullen, the current Moderator of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. His year as Moderator comes as he completes 20 years as minister of a local congregation in Bangor.

In this first part of the interview, Charles talks about his early years in County Tyrone and learning as a child to love Jesus. One of the key influencers in his life was one of his church ministers who effectively functioned as a kind of mentor to him.

After school Charles left Northern Ireland, first to study in Dublin (where the head of the German department became a mentor) and then in Oxford (where he read Modern European History). At Oxford he had the opportunity to meet a number of people from a range of church backgrounds. He mentions some of the work of an Oxford minister called Caryl Micklem: you can check out one of his books on prayer here.

After a season of feeling like a boat being tossed at sea, Charles surrendered to the sense of God calling him and after Oxford he began theological studies in Belfast. He then served as assistant minister in Lisburn before moving to lead the congregation in Legacurry, a rural congregation not far from there.

As you listen to Charles, here are a couple of things to reflect on:

  • Charles makes a point about reaching a place where he is sufficiently secure in his identity in Christ to be able to reach out to others and be enriched by them? Do you think we put up barriers out of insecurity?
  • Have you found it easier to discern God’s leading in retrospect?

THE LEADERSHIP JOURNEY PODCAST SEASON 2, EPISODE 16: RUSSELL BIRNEY PART 3

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This week we wrap up the conversation with Russell Birney. If you have missed the first two parts, you can catch up with them here and here.

In this week’s episode Russell talks about the process of leading change (be aware that people have different attitudes to change), and about some of the biggest challenges he faced in leadership.

He also has advice about retirement, and shares his main lessons on spiritual leadership:

  1. The importance of a consistent walk with God;
  2. Making sure your personal priorities are in order: beware of the cost of ‘success’!
  3. Be accountable to someone who will pray for you and strengthen you;
  4. Dispense with the idea of status!

And here is James Lawrence’s visual representation of how people respond to change (from his book, Growing Leaders):

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A question for leaders:

  • Are there issues which you believe to be ‘red lines’, where people need to be challenged?

Next week’s guest is Roz Stirling, director of Cleopas Ministries.

 

THE LEADERSHIP JOURNEY PODCAST, SEASON 2, EPISODE 13: DAVID DUNLOP (part 2)

David Dunlop

In this week’s episode we resume David Dunlop’s story.

David describes some significant conversations that took place while on sabbatical including how he was introduced to the programme of Arrow Leadership and their work on issues of character, calling and competence in leaders. Arrow proved to be a huge formative experience for David.

Another key encounter during his sabbatical was with someone who asked him what he was doing to guard his heart (see Proverbs 4:23). Such was the impact that this verse has become David’s life verse.

From there David goes on to talk about spiritual disciplines/holy habits and describes a number of practices including a rule of life that includes spiritual disciplines, self care, use of time, and silent retreats.

As a leader he recognises the importance of being aware of perceived expectations and avoiding becoming proud when he’s praised and crushed when he is criticised. He also talks about the role of other people in his life, including the importance of his wife in helping him to guard his heart.

David also talks about his journey as a (reluctant, not unwilling) leader in Windsor – not least in his preaching ministry. We also talk about team and how David has experienced that in Windsor Baptist.

He also gets the opportunity to speak to a young version of himself and shares advice he would give which includes this: ‘If you want to be in leadership for a short time, knock yourself out’, and the advice to hold some things lightly.

 



If you would like to know more about the Arrow Leadership course you can find out more on their websites: the international site is here, and the Irish site is here.

And you can find out more about Windsor Baptist Church here.

Here are some of the books and authors mentioned in the podcast:

Carson Pue: Mentoring Leaders;

James Lawrence: Growing Leaders;

Mark Buchanan: Your God is too Safe,

Mark Buchanan: The Rest of God;

Burns, Chapman and Guthrie: Resilient Ministry.


For your own reflection:

  • What are you doing to guard your heart?
  • Do you follow any kind of rule of life?
  • If your leadership involves preaching, how do you ensure that you allow the Scripture to speak?
  • Are you clear about who you are as a leader, without needing to try to be someone you are not?
  • What is your rule of thumb about what can be held lightly and what needs to be held firmly?

THE LEADERSHIP JOURNEY PODCAST, SEASON 2, EPISODE 12: David Dunlop

David Dunlop

This week’s guest is David Dunlop, pastor of Windsor Baptist Church in South Belfast (yes, another South Belfast Baptist Church) – a diverse church which can count 15-18 nationalities on a Sunday. He has just celebrated his tenth anniversary as pastor of the church (and not so long ago, his 50th birthday).

David describes how he came to faith in Christ as a child, so beginning a journey that has continued (with some bumps in the road) for over 40 years. He describes a stage of ‘going through the motions’ in terms of church, and reaching a point of recommitment at 18 – not least through involvement in an event that many Northern Irish Christians (of a certain age) will remember: Mannafest.

In terms of early influence he describes the example of the pastor of the church where he grew up (though David had no pastoral aspirations at that time) and some teachers he knew at school.

In his early 20s he was given the opportunity (along with his wife) to lead the church youth group. He talks about one of the key lessons from his work with young people – the importance of building trust and earning the right to speak: something he believes was ‘caught, not taught’. They underwent training  on a youth ministry course with Oasis Trust in London.

At the end of the training, there was an opportunity for both David and his wife to work as the youth pastoral team in their home church in Ballynahinch – where they served for 13 years (though their roles changed after 8 years). David describes the enjoyment of working in a team, but the highlight was working with the young people and the privilege of journeying with them through various stages of growth and development.

He also talks about the journey of moving from Ballynahinch to Windsor Baptist (despite having resolved that he would never be a pastor). His experience of ‘calling’ is a little different from how others have experienced it!

For your own reflection:

How do you respond to David’s thoughts and experience in the lead up to moving to Windsor Baptist? Does this challenge what you have tended to think in terms of ‘the call’? What about the role of other people in helping us to discern in our decision-making?

 

The Leadership Journey Podcast – Season Two, Episode five: Trevor Ramsey (part 2)

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Trevor Ramsey is back this week continuing his story.

In this podcast episode he talks about his involvement in the foundational years of Greenisland Baptist – a season that brought with it some life-shaping personal moments, including his journey through grief after the painful loss of his first wife, Sheila. He goes on to talk about a new phase in his life, both personally (in marrying Maggie) and in terms of his leadership, as he responds to the invitation of the elders of Newtownbreda Baptist Church to become their Senior Pastor.

In the final part of the podcast Trevor describes some of the most important lessons leaders need to be aware of, including the need to lead from a full heart and the significance of humility.

If you would like to find out more about the church where Trevor pastors, you could visit their website – and you can even catch some of the preaching that’s been part of the current themed series Trevor talks about in the podcast.

For your reflection:

  • Which of the lessons Trevor highlights strikes you most? Is there something you think you could do in response?

 

THE LEADERSHIP JOURNEY PODCAST – Season Two, episode four: Trevor Ramsey

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Trevor Ramsey is Senior Pastor of Newtownbreda Baptist Church in South Belfast, one of the largest Baptist churches in Ireland.

In this week’s episode of the podcast Trevor talks about coming to faith in Christ as a teenager and some of the early influences on him as a young Christian. He talks about his decision to pursue his sense of call by resigning from his job to study at Belfast Bible College, and about his subsequent time as pastor of Limerick Baptist Church in the Irish Republic, including what God taught him the evening no one turned up for the evening service!

For your own reflection:

  • Think about what Trevor says about discerning the call of God: have you experienced the elements he talks about?
  • Trevor talks about realising that what God wanted to do in him mattered more than what God wanted to do through him: have you seen this to be true in your own leadership?

 

The Leadership Journey Podcast (26): Malcolm Duncan (part one)

 

9ey7xfrc_400x400The guest this week (for the next three weeks, in fact) is Malcom Duncan. After spending the past thirty years away from Northern Ireland, where he grew up, Malcolm has recently taken up the role of Senior Pastor in Dundonald Elim Church in East Belfast. Previously – most recently – he was Senior Pastor of Gold Hill Baptist Church in England. Malcolm is well known as a conference speaker at events such as Spring Harvest and New Horizon.

In this week’s podcast, Malcolm talks about returning to the country he left three decades ago, he talks about his dramatic conversion experience at sixteen (which he believes also constituted his call to Christian ministry), and he shares some of his thoughts on leadership and mentoring.

Questions for reflection:

  • As you listen to Malcolm describe his conversion experience, reflect on how you came to faith? Was it a dramatic experience, or was it more gradual? Someone has suggested that some conversions are more ‘Emmaus Road’ than they are ‘Damascus Road’.
  • What do you think of Malcolm’s rationale for team leadership? Do you have a theological foundation for your own leadership model?
  • Do you have a Timothy and/or a Paul figure in your life?
  • ‘You cannot lead people you don’t love’: what do you make of this comment?

You can catch also Malcolm’s ‘nite blessing’ – a prayer for each evening – via his Twitter page – @malcolmjduncan, or on his Facebook page – RevMalcolmDuncan.